Midwest Bi* Activist

knowhomo:

Note: This survey is set for 1,000 responses (max). In the first 24 hours, we’ve had 703 of you share your insight. It looks like we will cap out this evening. If you’d like to participate, we recommend sooner than later. Also, if you run an LGBTQ* website and feel you have friends, family, and followers who may provide their own time, it’s not to late to share this and get credited in the graphics at the end of the month.

Keep On, Keeping On! - Rebecca

KNOWhomo’s Quarterly Survey

After a gathering with friends last month, we started to discuss what “labels” we use when describing ourselves to our peers and other members of the LGBTQ* family. There was also discussion about terms that are slowly disappearing from our lexicon (or evolving into a more inclusive term).

The KNOWhomo.tumblr Team would love your insight and we have created a brief survey (3 questions in length).

The survey is anonymous but we ask that you answer it sincerely. We also ask that if you are comfortable sharing the link with your peers, please do so. We would like to break 1000 individuals and create a Tumblr KNOWhomo series of graphs/infographs. We can only do this with your help.

If you are a prominent Tumblr page (representing the LGBTQ* community, not a personal page), PM us your page so we can credit those who get the information out. 

Keep On, Keeping On!

-Rebecca

use "that’s a single story" instead of "that’s a stereotype" less of attack, more effective for dialogue
suggestion for effective talking points + strategy from GLSEN Research (via bialogue-group)
bisexual-community:

bimagazine:

The Bisexual Revolution Will Be Tumbled, YouTubed and Tweeted
Major magazines call us “slacktivists”, a generation of social media savvy youth whose sole contribution to social justice causes consist of clicking “like” on facebook statuses posted by various Big Gay Inc … it is most certainly not true for all of us. In fact the internet and social media are revolutionizing bisexual activism in a positive way that is anything but “slacktivist” …
Tumblr has one of the most active and vibrant bisexual communities anywhere online. There discussions are constantly going on about what it means to be a bisexual, how can we phrase and express our desires in a way that is both true and affirming and inclusive of transgender people.
New ideas are constantly created, discussed and honed, in between posts of pictures of Easter Eggs, Sneakers and much cool bisexual swag to acquire. Among the may voices are such notables as Author Jan Steckel; Academic & Author Shiri Eisner; Vlogger & Artist Ritch Ludlow; Editrix Jen Yockney; Bi Blogger Patrick RichardsFink; Writer Jacqueline Applebee; Salt Lake City’s 1 to 5 Club; 20+ years of bi political action on Bialogue; the discerning reader’s delight Bisexual Books; USA’s Transcending Boundaries Conference & Midwest Bi Activist; Bisexual London and many, many more.
Along with well known writers and academics are thousands of everyday bisexual people. There were people living in rural regions like me … There are big city bisexuals … Everyone brings a different and unique perspective to the bi tumblr community from intersecting issues of race, class, education and age, we all have a different and important perspective on what being a bisexual in the 21st century means.
It is on the internet where the original inclusive definitions of bisexual is being promoted and discussed.
Thanks to the internet’s ability to connect bisexual people, everyone has a voice. What had slowly been being morphed into a dumbed down description of bisexuality as “attraction to men and women” or “attraction to both genders” that were being promoted by the Big Gay/Lesbian Groups and their Straight Allies were deemed unsatisfactory.
And it is on facebook, twitter and tumblr that the old inclusive definitions of bisexual such as “same gender and other genders” or "more then one gender” are being reasserted, not only to other bisexuals but also to larger LGBT blogs and organizations.
Conversations about creating safe and inclusive spaces in the real world abound … When I run into a problem with my real world activism I know I can always pull out my smart phone or go to my laptop and post about it and a large supportive activist community will be there to help me out in solving it … 
Far from being “slacktivists” online bisexual activists are often leading the way, writing, theorizing and discussing things among themselves and saving lives with their displays of pride. Resisting blocks on our identity by major corporations and fighting both online and off for a better world for bisexuals is an amazing thing and far from being “slacktivist”.
Click HERE to read the full article
Aud Traher is a Bisexual-Trans Activist, local LGBT organizer, blogger, local craftperson, a member of the Pennsylvania Student Equality Coalition (PSEC) and anthropology major living in working in a rural community in Eastern Central Pennsylvania. Having been an organizer in the college’s LGBT Group and noticing the need for similar services that included people in the town and countryside, Aud decided to found a local LGBT Group open to all.

Bisexual people have a thriving international Community; a long and illustrious History of queer activism; and a thriving, joyful and distinct queer Culture.And while we welcome everyone to join us as friends, family and allies, we don’t actually need or want any monosexuals - gay straight or lesbian — to find us, fix us, validate our existence; rename us or define us.

bisexual-community:

bimagazine:

The Bisexual Revolution Will Be Tumbled, YouTubed and Tweeted

Major magazines call us slacktivists, a generation of social media savvy youth whose sole contribution to social justice causes consist of clicking “like” on facebook statuses posted by various Big Gay Inc … it is most certainly not true for all of us. In fact the internet and social media are revolutionizing bisexual activism in a positive way that is anything but “slacktivist”

Tumblr has one of the most active and vibrant bisexual communities anywhere online. There discussions are constantly going on about what it means to be a bisexual, how can we phrase and express our desires in a way that is both true and affirming and inclusive of transgender people.

New ideas are constantly created, discussed and honed, in between posts of pictures of Easter Eggs, Sneakers and much cool bisexual swag to acquire. Among the may voices are such notables as Author Jan Steckel; Academic & Author Shiri Eisner; Vlogger & Artist Ritch Ludlow; Editrix Jen Yockney; Bi Blogger Patrick RichardsFink; Writer Jacqueline Applebee; Salt Lake City’s 1 to 5 Club; 20+ years of bi political action on Bialogue; the discerning reader’s delight Bisexual Books; USA’s Transcending Boundaries Conference & Midwest Bi Activist; Bisexual London and many, many more.

Along with well known writers and academics are thousands of everyday bisexual people. There were people living in rural regions like me … There are big city bisexuals … Everyone brings a different and unique perspective to the bi tumblr community from intersecting issues of race, class, education and age, we all have a different and important perspective on what being a bisexual in the 21st century means.

It is on the internet where the original inclusive definitions of bisexual is being promoted and discussed.

Thanks to the internet’s ability to connect bisexual people, everyone has a voice. What had slowly been being morphed into a dumbed down description of bisexuality as “attraction to men and women” or “attraction to both genders” that were being promoted by the Big Gay/Lesbian Groups and their Straight Allies were deemed unsatisfactory.

And it is on facebook, twitter and tumblr that the old inclusive definitions of bisexual such as “same gender and other genders” or "more then one gender” are being reasserted, not only to other bisexuals but also to larger LGBT blogs and organizations.

Conversations about creating safe and inclusive spaces in the real world abound … When I run into a problem with my real world activism I know I can always pull out my smart phone or go to my laptop and post about it and a large supportive activist community will be there to help me out in solving it … 

Far from being “slacktivists” online bisexual activists are often leading the way, writing, theorizing and discussing things among themselves and saving lives with their displays of pride. Resisting blocks on our identity by major corporations and fighting both online and off for a better world for bisexuals is an amazing thing and far from being “slacktivist”.

Click HERE to read the full article


Aud Traher is a Bisexual-Trans Activist, local LGBT organizer, blogger, local craftperson, a member of the Pennsylvania Student Equality Coalition (PSEC) and anthropology major living in working in a rural community in Eastern Central Pennsylvania. Having been an organizer in the college’s LGBT Group and noticing the need for similar services that included people in the town and countryside, Aud decided to found a local LGBT Group open to all.

Bisexual people have a thriving international Community; a long and illustrious History of queer activism; and a thriving, joyful and distinct queer Culture.

And while we welcome everyone to join us as friends, family and allies, we don’t actually need or want any monosexuals - gay straight or lesbian — to find us, fix us, validate our existence; rename us or define us.

bimagazine:

Finalists of the 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards: Bisexual Nonfiction

Looking for the very best in contemporary Bisexual Thought & Bisexual Culture? Look no further than the Eight Finalists in the Bisexual Categories of the Lambda Literary Foundation Awards.

Now in their Twenty-Sixth Year, the Lambda Literary Awards honor achievement in LGBTQ writing for books published in 2013. This year our community has a wonderful selection, with Five Books in the Bisexual Fiction Category and Three Books in the Bisexual Nonfiction Category.

Every one of them a winner and all well worth your time and attention!

Finalists of the 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards in the category Bisexual Nonfiction are:

Click HERE to read the full article

bimagazine:

Finalists of the 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards: Bisexual Fiction

Looking for the very best in contemporary Bisexual Thought & Bisexual Culture? Look no further than the Eight Finalists in the Bisexual Categories of the Lambda Literary Foundation Awards.

Now in their Twenty-Sixth Year, the Lambda Literary Awards honor achievement in LGBTQ writing for books published in 2013. This year our community has a wonderful selection, with Five Books in the Bisexual Fiction Category and Three Books in the Bisexual Nonfiction Category.

Every one of them a winner and all well worth your time and attention!

Finalists of the 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards in the category Bisexual Fiction are:

Click HERE to read the full article

No Longer at the Kids Table: Bisexuality A Useful Fiction, a Response

thebicast:

No Longer at the Kids Table: Bisexuality A Useful Fiction, a Response

Lynnette:

Yes…and thank you.

Originally posted on Vega’s Voice:

It’s been a while since I posted and, as I’ve mentioned before it’s hard for me to blog and write a novel at the same time. That however is changing this month, starting with this post.

I was searching for something to write about. Should I tackle life as an author with a day job? Nope. Covered that. Should I ramble about the dog? …

In the recent Slate.com article which made me, and a bunch of other bisexual activists sit up and spill our coffee all over our keyboards, it was yet again explained to the bi community that because we have to keep defending our existence, we do not have a culture. We do not and cannot have books, have literature, have fiction, have stories.

We are too busy trying to prove we exist so we cannot possibly have time to create our own worldview. It was explained to us. It was hypothesized for us.

No, no Mr. Stern, we are not in fact seeking a culture. We have one and it is vibrant and beautiful. Our consistent need to prove ourselves comes from a lack of understanding from Gay and Straight Inc over our very existence. (I keep using this word.)

It comes from TV shows and movies treating us like kinky sluts (though there is nothing wrong with being one), it comes from the media not allowing for positive bi/pan characters in their storytelling. It comes from the erasure of our heroes, from Virginia Woolf to Tom Daley. It comes from a recent post in Utah’s 1 to 5 Club Facebook Group. The post was for a social site for queer women. The poster warned community members that if you are married to a man, it wasn’t for you, you wouldn’t be welcomed. It comes from Google still considering the search term “‎bisexual‬” to be porn. Gay and Lesbian have automatic fill options. Bisexual does not.

The problem I have found is that people outside the bi community struggle with the idea that our identity can be as ‪‎fluid‬ as the individuals within it.

We are ‎butch‬ and ‎femme‬ all at once. We are ‪‎dykes‬, we are ‎queer‬, we enjoy being as serially monogamous as stereotypical teenage girls and we are comfortable and happy within poly identities. We are whole in who we are. We have families and lives and we are more than “passing” into one culture or another. We have our own shorthand, our own conversations, and our own controversies. As language changes so must we and so we seek to always define and redefine life and love within a world that is moving ever faster toward acceptance of normalcy …

CLICK HERE to Read Full Article on WordPress

bialogue-group:

An issue that bisexual activists had with Google seemed to be resolved, but it turns out that’s not the case.

A new petition is making the rounds demanding that search engine Google firmly update its autocomplete function to utilize the word "bisexual," as it does for other words relating to sexual orientation and gender identity, such as "gay," "lesbian," and "transgender."

A Google spokesperson told The Advocate Thursday that search terms often do not show up through the autocomplete function because they may be highly correlated with searches for pornography …

As of Friday, a search for the word "gay" yielded 302 million results, "lesbian" had 155 million results, while "bisexual" had 43.1 million, and "transgender" had 12 million. While Google has explained that the autocomplete function has dropped off for bisexuality because of its high correlation to porn, other words with a high correlation to pornography are still available with the autocomplete function.

Searching "gay porn" will produce 527 million results. A search for "lesbian porn" yielded 69.1 million results, and "transgender porn" yielded 19.2 million (though one could argue those are not necessarily the terms a person would naturally use). Meanwhile, searching for "bisexual porn" came up with 40.1 million results

"One of the biggest issues facing bisexuals is isolation and lack of community,” Jim Larsen of the Bisexual Organizing Project said on the Change.org petition page. "When the #1 search engine in the world makes it harder to find information and a community, it is terribly unfortunate.”

Jim Larsen from the Minneapolis based Bisexual Organizing Project was quoted in a recent Advocate Magazines piece on the need for Google to end their autocomplete ban on the word Bisexual to help alleviate the distress and isolation many bisexual people still suffer from.

bialogue-group:

bimagazine:

bisexual-books:

image

Recently, I was looking for a copy of the Jan-March 2014 issue of The Journal of Bisexuality. I couldn’t access it online through my local university because of a database embargo (basically, the publisher won’t release it electronically until 18 months after publication) , so I decided to get a copy of the article I wanted through interlibrary loan

Folks, interlibrary loan is your secret best friend! Basically, you ask your library for a book, and they don’t have it themselves, they go and ask other libraries to send the book to them. Interlibrary loan is a great way to find bisexual books if your library doesn’t own any. If you are in the United States, most libraries will do this for free. I love interlibrary loan! I read tons of books on interlibrary loan.  One of the tools for interlibrary loan is WorldCat, a catalog of library holdings across the world, including both print and electronic holdings. And that’s when I discovered we have a problem:

There are exactly 60 libraries in the world that own the Journal of Bisexuality, and only 37 libraries in the United States.

This is a huge deal. The Journal of Bisexuality is the premiere journal for bisexuality studies, and only 60 libraries have it!

The Journal of Bisexuality has existed for over 10 years now. It’s the only peer reviewed journal that focuses on the study of bisexuality and bisexual people. It’s sponsored by the American Institute of Bisexuality and has an upstanding reputation, focusing on issues such as new research, therapy, media, politics, and bisexual differences from the heterosexual, gay, and lesbian communities.  Mainstream, hegemonic studies of sexuality regularly ignore or exclude bisexuals. But the Journal of Bisexuality has been one of the forerunners in establishing the respectful study of bisexual people as an academic field. If so many libraries are missing it, this is a real issue for researchers.

We’ll let public libraries off the hook for a minute – lots of public libraries don’t carry academic journals, because they are expensive and there isn’t as much demand. But college and university libraries are a different matter.  There are 4,495 Title IV-eligible degree-granting institutions of higher education in the United States alone (2,774 of them traditional four-year institutions).  This means that if you are at a college or university and you want to read up on some bisexuality studies, there is only 0.8% chance that your university library has it.

Just to give you some context, approximately 683 libraries worldwide own the Journal of Homosexuality – which isn’t a great number, but it’s a darn sight better than 60.

I know not every library in the world can have every journal, and the Journal of Bisexuality is not appropriate for every collection development policy. It’s an expensive academic journal and wouldn’t be cost-effective for many small libraries. I myself work at a community college library, and we’ll never buy the Journal of Bisexuality because it doesn’t directly support our technical degree programs. And it’s also possible that some libraries simply don’t have listings for it. Community center libraries may have it, but not have the resources to catalog them. Certain archives don’t list their materials in World Cat at all.

But for major universities, most of which use WorldCat and most of which have a Genders Studies program, the Journal of Bisexuality should be a core part of the LGBT collection. Several of these universities also have LGBT/Queer Studies programs as well.   To have the Journal of Bisexuality missing from so many gender studies collections is a big disappointment.   Anyone who claims to be doing research in gender and sexuality should have access to this journal. 

Is there anything else the fills the need for bisexual studies? At this time, unfortunately, the answer is no; no other journal consistently fills the need for the study of non-monosexual identities.

Do librarians believe bisexuality is not an essential part of gender and sexuality studies? Or do they assume that bisexuality is subsumed under the study of gay men and lesbians? Both answers are possibilities, both are incorrect, and both are equally damaging.

~Ellie

PS: I’d also like to add that anyone who still thinks this isn’t a problem should read/listen to this first - Sarah

Please request that your library subscribe to the Journal of Bisexuality

IMPORTANT! All Students, Researchers, Professors, Academics, Librarians, etc. worldwide should be doing this. Ask your University or School Library how you go about making a Formal Request that they carry an Academic Journal. And then follow thru. If people do Not request it, they will Not subscribe.

Bisexual - A person whose enduring physical, romantic and/or emotional attraction is to other people of various sexes and/or gender identities. Individuals may experience this attraction in differing ways and degrees over their lifetime.
bisexual-community:

lostsisterhood:

My copy of Bi Any Other Name finally arrived!  And I was starting to think it got lost on the way. I can’t wait to read it!

One of the editors is Lani Ka’ahumanu who is a badass bisexual woman of color and one of the founders of the bisexual movement in the US. This anthology contains essays by Robyn Ochs, co-editor Professor Loraine Hutchins, Naomi Tucker and other bisexual activists and authors!

Know Your Bisexual History: The Bisexual Community in the USA has always been a “Majority Minority” movement, where many of the founding members came to activism from the Civil Rights and Indigenous People’s Movements.In 1994, bisexual activists Lani Ka’ahumanu, Ibrahim Abdurrahman Farajajé, Laura Perez, and Victor Raymond, all from the Indigenous Queers/Bisexual Caucus, presented “Preaching to the Perverted or Fluid Desire”, at the National HIV Prevention/Education Summit held by the Association of Physicians for Human Rights (now the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association).

Fun Fact: Bisexual + Indigenous People’s Activist, Victor Raymond, PhD is one of the founders of the BECAUSE Conference (Bisexual Empowerment Conference, A Uniting Supportive Experience), an annual Midwest Regional Queer Conference created + organized by the Bisexual Community for all LGBTQ People. You can read a 2012 interview  with Professor Raymond + other Midwestern Activists about BECAUSE here: 20 Years of Bisexual Conferencing with BECAUSE.

bisexual-community:

lostsisterhood:

My copy of Bi Any Other Name finally arrived! And I was starting to think it got lost on the way. I can’t wait to read it!

One of the editors is Lani Ka’ahumanu who is a badass bisexual woman of color and one of the founders of the bisexual movement in the US. This anthology contains essays by Robyn Ochs, co-editor Professor Loraine Hutchins, Naomi Tucker and other bisexual activists and authors!

Know Your Bisexual History: The Bisexual Community in the USA has always been a Majority Minority movement, where many of the founding members came to activism from the Civil Rights and Indigenous People’s Movements.

In 1994, bisexual activists Lani Ka’ahumanu, Ibrahim Abdurrahman Farajajé, Laura Perez, and Victor Raymond, all from the Indigenous Queers/Bisexual Caucus, presented Preaching to the Perverted or Fluid Desire, at the National HIV Prevention/Education Summit held by the Association of Physicians for Human Rights (now the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association).

Fun Fact: Bisexual + Indigenous People’s Activist, Victor Raymond, PhD is one of the founders of the BECAUSE Conference (Bisexual Empowerment Conference, A Uniting Supportive Experience), an annual Midwest Regional Queer Conference created + organized by the Bisexual Community for all LGBTQ People. You can read a 2012 interview with Professor Raymond + other Midwestern Activists about BECAUSE here: 20 Years of Bisexual Conferencing with BECAUSE.